A father’s hand-illustrated envelopes sent to his children over a span of 30 years documents one of the most troubling periods of war-torn British history through ink and paper.  Frederick Charles Tolhurst, a unionist worker from Stockwell, south London, posted more than 200 letters to his beloved children, Vera and Reginald, between the First and Second World War. Each envelope was carefully decorated with hand-drawn images – some happy, some sad – that referenced the changing mood of Britain as the country went through drastic changes between 1909 to 1940. Some envelopes contained warfare imagery; searchlights over London during the blackout, a solitary soldier huddled in a trench, war planes and paratroopers falling from an iron sky and gun barrels from the ground below. A letter sent by Frederick Charles Tolhurst to his family show war planes with paratroopers and parachutes floating down to the ground, and barrel of guns in the foreground. Each envelope he decorated with hand-drawn images that referenced a different a key event that was happening to Britain at the time Toys and dolls flop out of an old brown boot that floats on a bed of water (left). A flock of ...