International Paper’s Maysville Mill awarded $50,000 in International Paper Foundation grants to nine local organizations, demonstrating the company’s commitment to education, hunger, health & wellness, disaster relief and initiatives that improve our planet.

“We are privileged to be able to support local organizations in their efforts to make a difference in the lives of residents in our community,” said Doug Wadley, mill manager, International Paper Maysville Mill. “We are able to provide resources to address critical needs in the communities where our employees live and work, and the efforts of these organizations serve to strengthen our community.”

— Women’s Crisis Center to create and maintain a Maysville Green Dot website and a Maysville Green Dot mobile app. The Green Dot Violence Prevention Strategy is a national program that trains students, faculty and staff in bystander intervention to help prevent instances of power-based personal violence.

— Tollesboro Lions Club, Inc. to improve the blacktop walking trail. This walking trail is used by many members of our community as a safe location to walk to get exercise and enjoy the outdoors.

— Kentucky Gateway Museum Center to purchase 1,500 copies of the book “Everything I Never Told You” for the community reading program to promote diversity and inclusion.

— Tom Browning Boys and Girls Club to purchase materials and pay related expenses of the after school tutoring program, Making Minutes Count. This program provides one on one help from a tutor to a child on after school homework assignments or extra work to help the student meet benchmarks at their level.



— Licking Valley College Development Corporation to stock MCTC’s “Food for Thought” food pantries. The food pantries are stocked with grab and go breakfast, lunch and snack items and a small amount of take-home family dinner items.

— St. Patrick School to upgrade the library with Acer Chromebook-14’s and one mobile charging cart. This will promote learning and collaboration as teachers and students will be able to access the internet for activities that are presented in the teacher’s educational plan.

— Maysville Rotary Club Foundation to fund the purchase of kitchen equipment needed for the restoration of the Maysville Rotary Club Foundation’s Community Building utilized by countless community partners and nonprofits to further their missions.

— Bracken County Athletic Department to purchase materials for improvements to the girl’s locker room. They will build new wooden lockers that will allow the players to store and lock their belongings.

— Mason County Intermediate School to provide more musical opportunities for middle school students through a quality performance and recording venue. This space would have the necessary staging, backdrops, lighting, sound equipment and recording devices to not only provide the students with an exceptional performance space, but provide the equipment to begin learning about recording, video and how to use this technology to document and share their talents and hard work.

Grants were determined after careful review by a committee of local team members. Recommendations are subsequently reviewed by the International Paper Foundation’s grants committee, which then must be confirmed and ratified by the foundation’s board of trustees.

Organizations are invited to take an eligibility assessment at www.ipgiving.com to see if their program is eligible to apply for funding in 2020. For more information on the grant process, contact Heather Smeltser, coordinator, Communications, Maysville Mill, at 606-564-2641 or e-mail [email protected]

AUGUSTA — A local cocker spaniel and her human will be participating in the Westminster Kennel Club Show in New York City on Tuesday.

Augusta resident Dina Burke and her cocker spaniel “Dash” will be in ring four at 2 p.m., which will be lived streamed on AKC TV during the day.

“A lot of maintenance and care goes into breeding animals,” she said. “We do research on genetics and our dogs are health tested. There is more to it than a lot of people think.”

“Cockers are the smallest of the Sporting Group and are flushing spaniels, bred to flush small upland game out of brush, and to be merry and biddable. They are agile, have a “soft” mouth and will bring a bird to you unharmed. She is very sweet and will bring a ball to hand till the cows come home. She has a favorite red ball and loves liver as “bait” in the ring,” she said. “But most of all, she is just my dog.”

According to Burke, there are 2,500 dogs competing for best in show throughout the day and Dash will be among them.

In order to compete at Westminster, dogs have to be champions. Entry forms can be filled out and sent in and only 2,500 dogs can compete.

The streaming schedule can be found by visiting https://www.westminsterkennelclub.org/tv-schedule/tuesday-tv-schedule.

MOREHEAD — Robert G. (Rob) Hamm is a man who believes strongly in public service and his life’s journey reflects that sense of responsibility to others.

In addition to being a professor and program coordinator of HVAC technology at the Rowan Campus of Maysville Community and Technical College, the 57-year-old educator also serves in county government as an elected magistrate for District 4 of Rowan Fiscal Court.

As a retired lieutenant colonel with 27 years of military service, he is proud of his year-long tour of duty in Afghanistan as a member of the Kentucky Army National Guard deployed with the U. S. Army.

Hamm was injured in a vehicle rollover accident in Afghanistan but recovered to finish his tour with an agribusiness team trying to help rebuild the Afghan rural economy.

For his service overseas, he received the Bronze Star for meritorious service and the Combat Action Badge for being under enemy fire on several occasions.

Public service is a tradition in the Hamm family. His father, John (Pete) Hamm, is an Air Force retiree who later managed the Rowan County Ambulance Service for 20 years. He also served several terms on the county school board.

“Growing up in a military family obviously influenced my decision to seek an ROTC commission at Morehead State University,” the younger Hamm recalled. “Serving in the National Guard allowed me to also have a civilian career which eventually led me to teaching at the college level.”

He had classes in industrial arts in high school and earned a bachelor’s degree in industrial technology from MSU. From starting work in construction as a plumber’s helper, he later advanced to senior project manager and estimator, as well as becoming a journeyman plumber.

A downturn in construction put him back into the job market in 2004 when he was recruited to teach HVAC courses at MCTC’s Maysville campus by Jamie Brown, former director of Rowan Technical College, now part of MCTC.

His military obligations kept him away from teaching for a few years but he returned in 2012 to resume his classroom career, this time at the Rowan Campus.

“Community and technical colleges like MCTC are of great value to families and employers because we prepare most of our students to go to work immediately after finishing their course of study,” Hamm said. “The hands-on, high-tech learning environment at a very reasonable cost gets them ready for the real world.”

He says his interest in serving as a magistrate in county government grew out of his desire to see local governments and public agencies be more effective and efficient in using tax monies. He was elected to a four-year term in 2018.

“We already are seeing the benefits of more cooperation with each other,” Hamm stated. “I campaigned door-to-door and I try to keep in touch with the people in my district. I know they expect those of us in office to get the most out of what we spend on their behalf.”

Whether as a soldier, a county official or a college professor, Rob Hamm is a good example of the personal satisfaction that comes from public service.

“I am blessed to have opportunities each day to make a difference in the lives of others,” he said.

FRANKFORT — A bill that would create a fund to help offset costs for school resource officers and school counselors has been introduced in the Kentucky House of Representatives.

House Bill 381 says, “Moneys in the fund shall be used to support employment by local school boards of school resource officers and school counselors at schools located in the state. Moneys in the fund shall be appropriated solely for this purpose and shall not be appropriated or transferred by the General Assembly for any other purpose.”

According to the bill, the money will be taken from the ad valorem tax and 53 cents per $100 of value of all real property will be deposited into the fund.

At the end of each fiscal year, unused money in the fund would be carried over into the next fiscal year. The money would only be used to support SROs and school counselors by the local school boards and could not be transferred into the state general fund for any reason.

“I’m in favor of finding ways to help pay for them,” he said. “We need do whatever we can to make sure our kids are safe.”

Mason County Schools Superintendent Rick Ross said the district has two SROs and both are funded by the Mason County Sheriff’s Office.

“(The bill) would allow all of our schools to have full time SROs. Currently we have two that cover the entire district,” he said.

“Mental health support is our greatest unmet need,” he said. “Students are experiencing trauma on a level I’ve never seen in my career. This need is beyond what our schools can currently effectively address. Students struggle to learn when their mental health needs are unmet. We anticipate the school safety law will receive funding this session. Mason County is well ahead of the curve on the facilities requirements our needs lie in the mental health piece.”

Bracken County Schools Superintendent Jeff Aulick said the assistance for school districts is a need.

“The idea of additional counseling services and assistance with paying for our resource officer staff is a need without a doubt,” he said. “However, in the bill it states that it will help support these programs but at what level and will it be an additional unfunded mandate that our local district will have to cover? The safety and welfare of our children is always important and our district welcomes any assistance the state could offer. It has always been a concern if the funding will be sustainable and not a local district hardship in the future.”

Augusta Independent School Superintendent Lisa McCane said the district currently has a part-time SRO and 50 percent of the cost is covered by the district.

She said the bill would allow for a full-time SRO and increased services of a school-based therapist.

“We’ve seen a significant spike in mental health needs the last five to seven years,” she said. “Comprehend, Inc. has been a long-time partner with the district to provide a school-based therapist that in the past was one to two days per week and now is four-days per week and more time and resources are still needed. Our school counselor cannot keep up with the mental health demands because they are performing many other duties as a school counselor the general public may not realize. I’m glad our legislators recognize the need for funding to support schools for SROs and counselors but if it becomes another unfunded mandate it’s only going to be as good as the paper they’ve signed into law.”

Lewis County Schools Superintendent Jamie Weddington also said his district currently has two SROs, which is funded through a grant and federal money. He also believes the funding would be beneficial to school districts.

“We currently have two SROs — one at the Lewis County High School and one at Lewis County Middle School. The SRO at LCHS is paid for thru the COPS grant in collaboration with the Vanceburg Police Department. The SRO at LCMS is paid for thru Federal Title IV money in collaboration with the Lewis County Sheriffs office,” he said. “Any additional funding provided for counselling services would definitely benefit all our public school districts and students.”

Robertson County School Superintendent Sanford Holbrook said he hopes to see the bill pass, because it would make a difference for small districts.

Holbrook said the district currently has one SRO, which is funded through a one-year Browning Foundation grant and one school counselor who only became full-time this year.

“Our counselor has worked for the district for three years, but this is the first year she has been full-time,” he said. “We had to make cuts to make that happen. Really, we need a second one, but that isn’t something in our budget. Our SRO is paid through a one-year grant, so we don’t know what we’ll do next year.”

“It’s been great having our SRO,” he said. “He’s done a lot of good things in the district. He’s been a God send. It gives another person they can feel safe with and trust.”

That bill can be found at https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/20RS/hb381/orig_bill.pdf.

Another SRO related bill recently passed the Kentucky House and Senate and is going to the desk of Gov. Andy Beshear to sign, according to Sims.

That bill can be found by visiting https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/20RS/sb8/orig_bill.pdf.

GEORGETOWN, Ohio — Mor than half a million dollars in illegal drugs and more than 200 guns were taken off local streets in 2019 by the Brown County Drug and Major Crimes Task Force.

To help continue those efforts in 2020, Commander Justin Conley traveled to Columbus on Feb. 3 and was awarded $40,000 as part of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s “Recovery Ohio” program.

“We will use the funding for payroll, for drug buys, for educational programs. We also use it for education and training for police officers from multiple counties,” Conley said. “The grant will make a huge impact on our budget because without the backing of funding coming from the state, the task force wouldn’t exist.”

“It was made clear to us that this money is going to be distributed to those areas that are struggling with funding and don’t have the backing of a county with more resources.” He added that the grant was not just about catching bad guys.

“A large portion of it was distributed based on efforts beyond law enforcement like prevention, education and rehabilitation,” Conley said. “They want to encourage task forces to reach out and bridge that gap between local agencies in the county and work together as a team to help attack the drug issue.”

“Our cooperation with the board of mental health and Talbert House with the quick response team in our community helped set us up to be eligible for more grant funding,” Conley said.

The $40,000 received by the BCDMCTF was part of a total of two million dollars distributed to 27 existing drug task forces statewide. According to the governor’s office, “Funding will also be used to support the mission of Governor DeWine’s RecoveryOhio initiative which aims to increase substance use and mental health awareness, implement ageappropriate prevention education in schools, connect those who need help with treatment, and promote recovery.” Conley said that his task force is already working toward those goals.

“We do school talks and community and civic organizations as well as meet with local residents and officials about the drug problem” he said. “In 2019, we talked to approximately 1000 people in the area.” He sdaid he is gratful for the professionalism in the local law enforcement and treatment communities.

“We have a great working relationship with our local agencies and tremendous support from the public,” Conley said.

By the numbers, in 2019 Conley said that the BCDMCTF worked 71 cases that resulted in 57 indictments, with 36 of those for first degree felony charges. Additionally, 31 people were charged in federal court for drug offenses as a result of the task force’s work, compared to just one in 2017 and three in 2018. Conley said that 217 firearms were also seized as a result of task force investigations.

Methamphetamine continued to grow as a concern in Brown County last year. Conley said that six pounds of the drug were seized last year, compared to two pounds in 2018. Since 2017, the seizure of meth has grown tenfold. The single biggest case for the task force in 2019 was the arrest of 29 people for conspiracy to traffic methamphetamine and guns following a two year investigation.

“This was a great win for us as a drug task force in making such a large difference in our community based on the fact that were dealing in so much methamphetamine and so many firearms to a violent group of people,” Conley said. “They were pushing literally hundreds of pounds of methamphetamine into our area.”

Conley looked forward to 2020 by saying, “The fight is not over yet. We are going to continue to push forward and take down as many drug trafficking organizations that we can.”

He also wanted to thank the citizens of Brown County, both in their roles within the Coalition for a Drug Free Brown County and as individuals.

“If we didn’t have people in our community that were willing to do the right thing and support suspicious activity, we would have a much more difficult job,” Conley said. If anyone would like to donate funds, equipment or other items to the task force or wishes to report suspicious activity, the tip line telephone number is 937-378-2573.

SEAMAN, Ohio — Ohio First Lady Fran DeWine visited the North Adams Public Library in Seaman, Tuesday, to announce the launch of the Ohio Governor’s Imagination Library program in Adams County.

Through this program, all children in Adams County from birth to the age of 5 are eligible to receive a new book in the mail each month, free of charge, until their fifth birthday.

At the official launch of the program in Adams County, DeWine read two of her favorite books — The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Baking Day at Grandma’s — to local children in the North Adams Public Library. A press event was held afterward, and the first lady was introduced by Rev. Mike Parks of Church 180.

“Fran DeWine is a committed advocate for Ohio’s children,” said Parks. “She is a champion for kids’ nutrition, and cooking together as a family. As first lady, (DeWine) is also… fiercely passionate about improving childrens’ literacy by spearheading the Ohio Governor’s Imagination Library. As a mother of eight and grandmother to 24, she has seen first-hand the power of books to change a child’s life and set them up for success.”

“Today I encourage every parent in Adams County to register their children for the Ohio Governor’s Imagination Library,” said DeWine. “Reading is one of the single most important things we can do to prepare children for success in the classroom and beyond, and this program puts a new book in the hands of Ohio’s youngest children each month at no cost to their families. I look forward to the day.. when this program is available in all 88 Ohio counties.”

Research has shown that book ownership can be a predictor of future academic success. In fact, studies have found that children with just 25 books in their home were more likely to complete an additional two years of education, according to the official press release on this event.

These high-quality, age-appropriate books are provided through a partnership between the Ohio Governor’s Imagination Library and Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library. A full list of books that children will receive can be found on the Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library website. Notably, a certain percentage of books in each yearly list are educational, with some written in both English and Spanish, for example, and others containing fun food recipes, activity ideas, and more.

According to the official press release, “… the (OGIL) is working to ensure children in all 88 of Ohio’s counties can enroll in (OGIL) in 2020 by providing a dollar-for-dollar funding match with each county that opens OGIL to its residents. The Ohio General Assembly committed $5 million to OGIL in the state fiscal year 2020-2021 budget.”

It was noted that the program could not have launched in Adams County without the support of its local partners including Leadership Adams, the Adams County Public Libraries, Adams County Board of Developmental Disabilities, Wilson Worthy Poor Fund, Manchester Local School District, and Adams County Ohio Valley School District. Ohio First Lady Fran DeWine thanked these local partners for their support.

“I believe wholeheartedly that reading is the foundation for all success in life,” said Nick Slone, Adams County Public Library executive director. “We’re so excited about this initiative, and… thankful for the opportunity to be involved. The Adams County Public Library and Leadership Adams are fully committed to the growth, development and enrichment of all Adams County children.” Leadership Adams President Mike Pell spoke last, confirming Leadership Adams’ commitment to OGIL and stressing the importance of early literacy in inspiring young minds.

Enrollment can be completed online at https://imaginationlibrary.com/usa/affiliate/OHADAMS/, at all Adams County Public Library branches, or by mail. Physical forms can also be found at Adams County Job and Family Services, Children Services, and Adams County Board of DD.

Columbia Gas is expected to begin work again to replace gas lines in Maysville, officials said Friday.

Work in the east end area could get underway next week, Maysville Projects Manager David Hord said Friday. That project, named the Tyler Street project, includes 225 customers, he said.

As part of the project streets where gas lines will be replaced have been marked with paint and utility research is underway, Hord said. Residents should get letters telling them what to expect and the company will also likely distribute door hangers at homes affected by the project, he said.

According to the letters, residents while be notified when workers need to enter homes or businesses to connect or disconnect service.

During construction, old metal gas lines will be replaced with new high pressure plastic lines, Hord said. All services to houses and businesses will be replaced along with meters, he said.

Once work is completed, the company will conduct a natural gas safety inspection. Once a successful inspection is completed, appliances that may have been turn off will be re-lit, information form the company indicates.

Another Columbia Gas project will tackle the same issues in the Rogers Road-Germantown Road area and areas along West Second Street near Pogue Distillery. That project could begin next month, Hord said. The company is currently in the process of securing rights of way, he said.

A third project with the same goal — to replace lines, service and meters — is planned for Fourth Street this year, Hord said.

A project to replace gas lines along Third Street, originally planned for this year, is now scheduled for 2021, Hord said.

In another major project underway in Maysville, work has begun $7.1 million floodwall restoration, Hord said. About 20 trees were removed from the area near Hardymon’s Landing and taken away by barge recently as the initial phase of the work, he said.

The project will repair storm damage the levee suffered in February 2018 and will cover an area from Main Street to Commerce Street.

The project will address erosion and slippage along the levee and all issues will be addressed from the river side of the floodwall and involve the lower two-thirds of the wall, Nelson told city commission in December.

Earth removed from the project will be hauled to the Mason County Landfill and replaced with stone to prevent future erosion, Nelson said.

The cause of a fire at a Maysville home in the early morning hours Saturday that left one person dead has yet to be officially determined, Maysville Fire Chief Kevin Doyle said Sunday.

Maysville police and firefighters were dispatched at 12:40 a.m., to a residence at 316 East Fifth Street, according to information from Maysville Police Chief Jared Muse.

According to Doyle, the fire was discovered by EMS crew which had been on an ambulance run in the area. As they came across the Kehoe Viaduct as they returned to station, they noticed smoke and went to check its source, he said. When they arrived at the scene of the two-story wooden structure, the center portion of the home was on fire with flames shooting out the windows, Doyle said.

After calling in the alarm, the crew suited up in fire fighting gear and did a search of the area without finding anything, Doyle said. After learning from neighbors that the resident was still inside they did a second search but were hampered by collapsing walls and floors, he said.

Once the blaze was extinguished, firefighters located Barry Gibbs, 55, inside the residence after an extensive search, officials said. The victim apparently died from injuries he sustained in the fire, both Muse and Doyle said. No foul play is suspected, Doyle said,

Gibbs lived alone and had been dropped off at home about 45 minutes before the fire was reported, Doyle said,

Detectives with the Maysville Police Department are conducting an investigation into the death of Gibbs in coordination with the Maysville Fire Department and Kentucky State Police arson investigators.

Although no official cause of the fire has been discovered, Doyle said it started in the kitchen area near the cooking stove.

In addition to MFD and MPD, Kentucky Utilities, Maysville Utility Department, Maysville-Mason County Emergency Management, Mason County Coroner and KSP also responded to the scene of the blaze. The local chapter of the American Red Cross also responded to offer assistance to the family.

Columbia Gas is expected to begin work again to replace gas lines in Maysville, officials said Friday.

Work in the east end area could get underway next week, Maysville Projects Manager David Hord said Friday. That project, named the Tyler Street project, includes 225 customers, he said.

As part of the project streets where gas lines will be replaced have been marked with paint and utility research is underway, Hord said. Residents should get letters telling them what to expect and the company will also likely distribute door hangers at homes affected by the project, he said.

According to the letters, residents while be notified when workers need to enter homes or businesses to connect or disconnect service.

During construction, old metal gas lines will be replaced with new high pressure plastic lines, Hord said. All services to houses and businesses will be replaced along with meters, he said.

Once work is completed, the company will conduct a natural gas safety inspection. Once a successful inspection is completed, appliances that may have been turn off will be re-lit, information form the company indicates.

Another Columbia Gas project will tackle the same issues in the Rogers Road-Germantown Road area and areas along West Second Street near Pogue Distillery. That project could begin next month, Hord said. The company is currently in the process of securing rights of way, he said.

A third project with the same goal — to replace lines, service and meters — is planned for Fourth Street this year, Hord said.

A project to replace gas lines along Third Street, originally planned for this year, is now scheduled for 2021, Hord said.

In another major project underway in Maysville, work has begun $7.1 million floodwall restoration, Hord said. About 20 trees were removed from the area near Hardymon’s Landing and taken away by barge recently as the initial phase of the work, he said.

The project will repair storm damage the levee suffered in February 2018 and will cover an area from Main Street to Commerce Street.

The project will address erosion and slippage along the levee and all issues will be addressed from the river side of the floodwall and involve the lower two-thirds of the wall, Nelson told city commission in December.

Earth removed from the project will be hauled to the Mason County Landfill and replaced with stone to prevent future erosion, Nelson said.

Columbia Gas is expected to begin work again to replace gas lines in Maysville, officials said Friday.

Work in the east end area could get underway next week, Maysville Projects Manager David Hord said Friday. That project, named the Tyler Street project, includes 225 customers, he said.

As part of the project streets where gas lines will be replaced have been marked with paint and utility research is underway, Hord said. Residents should get letters telling them what to expect and the company will also likely distribute door hangers at homes affected by the project, he said.

According to the letters, residents while be notified when workers need to enter homes or businesses to connect or disconnect service.

During construction, old metal gas lines will be replaced with new high pressure plastic lines, Hord said. All services to houses and businesses will be replaced along with meters, he said.

Once work is completed, the company will conduct a natural gas safety inspection. Once a successful inspection is completed, appliances that may have been turn off will be re-lit, information form the company indicates.

Another Columbia Gas project will tackle the same issues in the Rogers Road-Germantown Road area and areas along West Second Street near Pogue Distillery. That project could begin next month, Hord said. The company is currently in the process of securing rights of way, he said.

A third project with the same goal — to replace lines, service and meters — is planned for Fourth Street this year, Hord said.

A project to replace gas lines along Third Street, originally planned for this year, is now scheduled for 2021, Hord said.

In another major project underway in Maysville, work has begun $7.1 million floodwall restoration, Hord said. About 20 trees were removed from the area near Hardymon’s Landing and taken away by barge recently as the initial phase of the work, he said.

The project will repair storm damage the levee suffered in February 2018 and will cover an area from Main Street to Commerce Street.

The project will address erosion and slippage along the levee and all issues will be addressed from the river side of the floodwall and involve the lower two-thirds of the wall, Nelson told city commission in December.

Earth removed from the project will be hauled to the Mason County Landfill and replaced with stone to prevent future erosion, Nelson said.

Lewis County Sheriff Johnny Bivens said a caller contacted dispatch just before 5 p.m. on Friday in relation to an incident on Dearing Lane in Tollesboro.

“A caller told dispatchers a man with a rifle was attempting to enter her home and had broken out windows,” Bivens said.

According to Bivens, the Lewis County Sheriff’s Office and Vanceburg Police Department responded to the scene and found 41-year-old Adrian D. Hord, of Tollesboro, had barricaded himself in a detached garage.

During the standoff, officers learned Hord had allegedly assaulted five people, which resulted in “extensive injuries to three adults and two children,” Bivens said.

Bivens said Hord allegedly fired shots in the direction of officers and officers fired two shots in return with their service weapons.

Hord was in communication with officers during the standoff and allegedly communicated that he had poured gasoline on himself and the garage around 10:10 p.m., according to Bivens.

Hord is charged with first-degree wanton endangerment of a police officer, attempted murder of a police officer and was lodged in the Lewis County Detention Center, where he remains. Other charges are pending and the investigation is ongoing.

According to Bivens, Kentucky State Police special response team also responded to the scene. KSP will continue the investigation.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife, Portsmouth Ambulance, Tollesboro Fire and Rescue, Lewis County Fire and Rescue, Black Oak Fire and Rescue and Lewis County Emergency Management also responded to the scene.

Crews are preparing to work on gas lines in the Tyler Street area of Maysville. Crews are preparing to work on gas lines in the Tyler Street area of Maysville. https://maysville-online.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/web1_work.jpgCrews are preparing to work […]

Carmeuse Lime and Stone’s Maysville operation recently laid off several dozen employees, officials said Tuesday. The company “had to make the difficult decision to proceed with permanent layoffs affecting several dozen employees at the Maysville, […]

MAYSVILLE — Howard D. Wilson, 78, of Maysville, passed away Monday, Feb. 10, 2020, at Meadowview Regional Medical Center. Born in Fleming County on July 23, 1941, he was the son of the late Jesse […]

PCP Champion in Ripley Ohio is seeking to hire positions for 1st Shift Sewing/Manufacturing Operators. We offer 401(k), Health, Dental and Vision available. Hours vary by facility. We are taking applications at: PCP Champion 1311 […]

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10 KENTUCKY BOYS BASKETBALL Williamstown 69, St. Patrick 51 Lewis County 62, Raceland 53 GIRLS BASKETBALL Augusta 77, Covington Latin 44 West Carter 83, Fleming County 32 Fairview 43, Lewis County 41 Pendleton […]

AUGUSTA — A local cocker spaniel and her human will be participating in the Westminster Kennel Club Show in New York City on Tuesday. Augusta resident Dina Burke and her cocker spaniel “Dash” will be […]

LOUISVILLE — The top teams in the Kentucky Associated Press high school basketball polls, with first-place votes, records, total points and previous rankings: BOYS Rank-School FPV Rcd TP Pvs 1. Ashland Blazer (8) 23-0 114 […]

MOREHEAD — Robert G. (Rob) Hamm is a man who believes strongly in public service and his life’s journey reflects that sense of responsibility to others. In addition to being a professor and program coordinator […]

The band wagon is overloaded with politicians and people that actually believe legalizing recreational marijuana is the answer to poverty, the golden ticket to funding education, and the Holy Grail of government woes. How about […]

FLEMINGSBURG — Pearl Iona Opal Hamm Dunaway Vice, 89, of Wallingford, passed away Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020, at Eagle Creek Nursing Center in West Union, Ohio. Opal was born in Rowan County on June 23, […]

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